Mindfulness and Gratefulness

Meditation, Mindfulness and Gratefulness

 

When most people think about meditation, they imagine a person sitting in the lotus position trying their best not to scratch those itches. Because once you put yourself in the lotus position and stop moving, everything starts itching.

The bad news is that you WILL start feeling itchy the second you close your eyes. The good news, however, is that once you start doing it right (meditating), your itches go away. Your stressful thoughts go away. Your never-ending problems go away. 

Everything goes away.

Except you. 

You and the universe. 

You become one with the universe. 

You feel connected to everything and you feel compassion for everything.

You still feel good about the good stuff, and bad about the bad stuff. But you stop hating, you stop spiting.

You feel at peace.

You realize how bad it is and feel compassion for those who do wrong.

You feel their pain and you understand them.

You understand they’re wrong, you understand that they don’t understand.

And you realize that you can’t feel anger anymore, you can’t feel bored, you can’t feel pressed or stressed.

And you’re fine with it.

You’re fine.

If doing push-ups is a way of working out your body, meditation is a way of working out your brain.

Many people will feel a sense of entitlement once they start meditating. They will undoubtedly feel better than before, but unfortunately feel better as a person than every other person they know. That’s the path to enlightenment, but don’t worry, it will pass.

Meditation can also be done in groups. The most enlightening type of meditation I’ve tried was active meditation. We would spread out evenly in a large room, close our eyes, and let ourselves be guided by the guru. A tribal music would be beating away in the background, but as the time would pass, the beats would sound stronger and stronger. We would be instructed to forget about our thoughts and concentrate on our body. Later in the exercise we would move, jump and stretch with our eyes closed. That alone would disrupt us from our smartphone-driven lives. Half an hour later we would open our eyes and see everything in a new light. Our phones would now look more like a bunch of props from a movie scene, other people would look more like weird curious creatures in the wild. You would think everything would seem distorted, but the feeling we all got was that of clarity, focus, and presence.

I wish I could be more of a guide to you in your path to enlightenment, but this is not the kind of journey you read in article. The purpose of the article is to make you hungry, curious about your personal path, your personal development, and to make you realize you need a master, to teach you how to be better every day, and one day even outshine him, your master. You can!

 

What’s your personal experience with Mindfulness and Gratefulness?

Share your thoughts in a comment below, or respond in a new post and share the link.

I look forward to read your responses!

 

 

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Self-Judgement

Is Self-Judgement Helpful ?

One of the things I do with clients (that both drives them crazy and helps them change!) is to point out their self-judging statements.

So often, someone is simply talking about their week, and they’ll say things like “I know this was silly, but it made me feel bad that…” or “it’s stupid, I know, but I…”

We all do this. Everyone I’ve ever talked to EVER does, anyway. The problem is that these self judgments just reinforce our beliefs about not being good enough.

Self-Judgement is our way of comparing ourselves to an idea self. “Someone more in control wouldn’t have silly emotions.” “If I was smarter, I wouldn’t have…” We’re building a less-than-helpful kind of learning when we constantly utter self-judging remarks.

I think that many of us entertain the belief that as soon as we change something, everything is going to be fine. The thing is, though, that what we’ve got right now, at this moment, is what we are. This is what we have to work with. And accepting that, truly loving that, builds a base for real change.

Here’s something to try, just for today. Catch yourself in self-judgment. Listen for statements like “I know this is dumb,” or “It’s silly, but…” and just forgive yourself for them. Just listen, observe, and then let them go.

Self-Judgement our judgments just digs the hole deeper. Enlist a friend if you’d like. But, see about starting down that path of less judgment. Other good things will follow.

The beauty is in the work. You’re doing the best you can!

 

 

 

 

Mindfulness and Gratefulness

Mindfulness and Gratefulness

 

When most people think about meditation, they imagine a person sitting in the lotus position trying their best not to scratch those itches. Because once you put yourself in the lotus position and stop moving, everything starts itching.

The bad news is that you WILL start feeling itchy the second you close your eyes. The good news, however, is that once you start doing it right (meditating), your itches go away. Your stressful thoughts go away. Your never-ending problems go away. 

Everything goes away.

Except you. 

You and the universe. 

You become one with the universe. 

You feel connected to everything and you feel compassion for everything.

You still feel good about the good stuff, and bad about the bad stuff. But you stop hating, you stop spiting.

You feel at peace.

You realize how bad it is and feel compassion for those who do wrong.

You feel their pain and you understand them.

You understand they’re wrong, you understand that they don’t understand.

And you realize that you can’t feel anger anymore, you can’t feel bored, you can’t feel pressed or stressed.

And you’re fine with it.

You’re fine.

If doing push-ups is a way of working out your body, meditation is a way of working out your brain.

Many people will feel a sense of entitlement once they start meditating. They will undoubtedly feel better than before, but unfortunately feel better as a person than every other person they know. That’s the path to enlightenment, but don’t worry, it will pass.

Meditation can also be done in groups. The most enlightening type of meditation I’ve tried was active meditation. We would spread out evenly in a large room, close our eyes, and let ourselves be guided by the guru. A tribal music would be beating away in the background, but as the time would pass, the beats would sound stronger and stronger. We would be instructed to forget about our thoughts and concentrate on our body. Later in the exercise we would move, jump and stretch with our eyes closed. That alone would disrupt us from our smartphone-driven lives. Half an hour later we would open our eyes and see everything in a new light. Our phones would now look more like a bunch of props from a movie scene, other people would look more like weird curious creatures in the wild. You would think everything would seem distorted, but the feeling we all got was that of clarity, focus, and presence.

I wish I could be more of a guide to you in your path to enlightenment, but this is not the kind of journey you read in article. The purpose of the article is to make you hungry, curious about your personal path, your personal development, and to make you realize you need a master, to teach you how to be better every day, and one day even outshine him, your master. You can!

 

What’s your personal experience with Mindfulness and Gratefulness?

Share your thoughts in a comment below, or respond in a new post and share the link.

I look forward to read your responses!