Lesson to Learn from a Successful Person

 

Everyday we hear about successful stories and role models. Every one of them different and unique in its own way. But yeah, you guessed it: all success stories have in common an underlying pattern. 

No successful man achieved success on his own. Think of Floyd Mayweather, Madonna, Mark Zuckerberg, now think about what they have in common? They all have the best teams they could possibly have. It’s never a lone effort. That’s the first rule: team work. It can also apply to befriending your clients and your suppliers. Recurring customers are the best. If what your selling brings more value to the people who buy it than the price they’re paying for it, they’ll feel they’ve done a great deal. And who doesn’t want recurring great deals? Work with your clients, not for them. And offer your suppliers value, not just money.

All successful people are surrounded by other successful people. Maybe not in the same field and not in the same way. But they’re all wonderful and inspiring people. They’re humble, even though they know their worth. And they’re giving out more than they’re getting back. Well, actually that’s it. Successful people give. That’s what they do, that’s how they function. That’s what makes them plentiful and resourceful. They give 200%. Yes, if an 8 hour work day five times per week is 100%, all successful people work more than that. Most of them reach (and some go over) 80 hours a week. That’s the second rule: work hard, win big.

Why do they do it? And how? How can people work so much doing the same thing? Are they super humans? Is this it? Drugs? No. They work a lot because they believe in their work. They believe that their product or service is something other people need, because they themselves needed that before they started the business. True belief comes from within, as a solution to a personal problem. That’s the third rule: believe in your product.

If you’ve ever met a successful person, depending on the person and depending on who you are as a person yourself, you might have had one of three experiences:

1) If you seemed interesting to them, they were extremely curious. And because they’d already been in your position at the time, they gave you a minor, almost insignificant advice. Why not more? Because they know it’s all about the journey, not the destination. It’s only later that you usually come to value their words of wisdom. But before they said anything, they listened to you. That’s rule number four: listen actively and be genuinely interested.

2) If you didn’t seem interesting to them, they didn’t hang around you for too long. So that’s the fifth rule: always value your time. It’s limited and it doesn’t wind back. It’s the one thing you can sell but can never buy.

3) If they considered you a successful person by their standards, you instantly became their hero of the day. It doesn’t matter if they were billionaires and you were just a natural surfer or deep thinker. By their standards you were a self thought life explorer. This is the sixth rule: always improve and always learn from those better than you.

If you happened to meet a successful person and they haven’t left any mark on you, you can be sure that you haven’t left any mark on them either. The seventh rule is this: be disruptive, leave a mark.

Whoever you’re working with, make them feel like they’re your biggest client/supplier. How can you do that? Engage them and engage them fast. Always reply to emails immediately after you get them. Thank them for writing you and assure them that you’ll get back to them shortly with a more detailed response. That’s the eighth rule: always value their time.

You should choose and know exactly what you’re offering. You can be the fastest in the business, the cheapest in the business or the most qualitative in the business. Just not all three at the same time. Rule number nine: know your product.

Whenever you feel pumped up about something, jot down what’s up with that, what’s keeping you motivated and interested. Then scale it up in whatever way you can to make it part of your life. Or, as Jim Ryun would put it (the tenth rule): Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what gets you going.

What’s your personal experience on the subject?

 

 

 

Jetpack

Jetpack

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